History is full of important history . . . especially historical history-making decisions.  One of the most historical and history-inducing events in the life of our young spunky country was the Revolutionary War, sometimes called the War for American Independence, or the War of Funny Pants and Gaudy Wigs.  A major event leading up to the war was actually the result of a typographical error in a nasty memo from the British government to the colonists threatening a tax. Because of the embarrassing error we seldom read in history books about the significance of the Boston Pea Party.  The colonists received a revised memo and did the tea thing in Boston Harbor.

Typograhical errors seemed to have been a way of life for our hearty forefathers in the 18th century. Thomas Paine wrote a pamphlet entitled, "Common Cents," in which he coined the now famous phrase, "These are the dimes that dry men's soles."  It was a celebration of his inventing the first shoeshine machine. Other misunderstandings that were thankfully corrected were "Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Toys;"   Patrick Henry saying "Give me liturgy or give me death;"  and Paul Revere screaming at the top of his lungs, "The British are humming! the British are humming!" What were the colonists thinking? Were the British attacking with a choir?

Several years later Thomas Jefferson was elected president because voters erroneously reasoned that if he could write the Declaration of Independence he could explain the electoral college.  In reality, he was elected because of another typographical error. The voters got disgusted with what they thought were the Alien and Sedation Acts.  They thought these were a series of laws passed by John Adams that gave aliens free dental work. It was not until Jefferson was elected that they relized it was supposed to be Alien and Sedition acts, a harmless policy that gave aliens free seditions. 

Jefferson then made a decision that would change the United States forever. He outlawed funny pants and gaudy wigs. This law stood untilt the 1970's. However, his big decision was to buy New Orleans and the Louisiana Territory.  Once he experienced Mardi Gras, cayenne pepper, chicory coffee, and crawdads he tried to give New Orleans back to France.

Our forefathers had a lot of decisions to make. Their choices laid the groundwork for a new and expanding country. They chose freedom over tryanny.  It sounds sort of biblical. A lot of decisions were made before, during,and after the crucifixion of Christ.  There were no typographical errors.  The people knew exactly what they were doing. Pilate chose not to decide. The crowd chose Barabbas instead of Jesus. The Jewish leaders chose law rather than faith. Jesus chose God rather than self. Judas chose money instead of the Master. Peter chose denial rather than commmitment.

Easter reminds us of a decision we have to make in life. What will we do with Jesus? It is not just a one-time choice. We must choose daily to follow Jesus.  We deny Christ whenever we choose anger over gentleness; hate instead of love; arrogance over humility; or sour grapes instead of the fruit of the Spirit. Easter reminds us to look at Jesus and answer the question, What will you do with him? Yes, the cock still crows . . . and people still cry, "Give us Barabbas!"

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